Global Prosperity

Learning Objectives: Understand the empirical evidence around economic growth and globalisation. 
Lecture handout: Global prosperity*

Here is my Economics Mission Statement, March 2018.

Some great videos to watch that explore the themes from the lecture:

Lecture handout: Stagnation*

For more on Permissionless Innovation

The importance of ideas:


These resources form part of my Managerial Economics course map. You can watch the full YouTube playlist here. This page ties into Chapter 12 of ‘Markets for Managers’.

 

Macro Policy Workshop

Learning Objectives: Test understanding and utilisation of important macro concepts. 
Group activity:Macro Policy Workshop“, March 2018

fincrisis

  • “Choose your own financial crisis” a role-playing app

     

    Instructor Resource: “Macro Policy Workshop: Solutions”, March 2018

    These resources form part of my Managerial Economics course map. You can watch the full YouTube playlist here. This page ties into Chapters 8 & 9 of ‘Markets for Managers’.

MPC Sim

Learning Objectives: Apply monetary policy judgment to current macroeconomic data.
Group activity: MPC Simulation, December 2012

You can read more details about the Bank of England’s MPC here. I used to regularly participate in the Shadow MPC. A useful resource may be the Kaleidic Dashboard.

Group activity: ECB Simulation, March 2011

These resources form part of my Managerial Economics course map. You can watch the full YouTube playlist here. This page ties into Chapter 8 of ‘Markets for Managers’.

International economics

Learning Objectives: Calculate foreign exchange. Understand Balance of Payments. 
Group activity: Josko Joras (A), December 2012

  • Instructions: Complete exercises 1,2, and 3

Read more about the Big Mac index at The Economist. For more on how Argentina games it, see:

Here’s an intro to Balance of Payments:

Instructor Resource: 

  • Josko Joras (A) Solutions, December 2012
  • Josko Joras (B), December 2012
  • Josko Joras (B) Solutions, December 2012

These resources form part of my Managerial Economics course map. You can watch the full YouTube playlist here. This page ties into Chapter 10 of ‘Markets for Managers’.

International Trade

Learning Objectives: Estimate the welfare effects of trade intervention
Group activity:

The best way to understand economic interdependence is the classic pamphlet I, Pencil.

This guy attempted to make a sandwich from scratch. It cost $1500 and took 3 months. It’s remarkable how cheap and plentiful sandwiches are, due to an extended global supply chain and division of labou.

This video shows the history of globalisation through some important maps:

Here we use basic demand and supply analysis to look at the welfare effects of trade intervention:


These resources form part of my Managerial Economics course map. You can watch the full YouTube playlist here. This page ties into Chapter 10 of ‘Markets for Managers’.

Fiscal multiplier

Learning Objectives: Perform back of the envelope calculations to estimate the fiscal multiplier for a range of different countries.

 

Group activity:Fiscal Multiplier Worksheet“, March 2018

Instructor Resource: “Fiscal Multiplier Worksheet: Solution”, March 2018

These resources form part of my Managerial Economics course map. You can watch the full YouTube playlist here. This page ties into Chapter 9 of ‘Markets for Managers’.

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Monetary Policy II

Learning Objectives: Apply the One Target One Tool framework to actual policy decisions.
Case: “The Euro in Crisis: Decision Time at the European Central Bank” Harvard Business School case no. 9-711-049

For an account of the financial crisis:

The key goal for monetary authorities is credibility: [Credibility flashcard]

What constitutes an optimal currency areas? [Optimal Currency Areas flashcard]


These resources form part of my Managerial Economics course map. You can watch the full YouTube playlist here. This page ties into Chapter 8 of ‘Markets for Managers’.

Monetary policy I

Learning Objectives: Understand the root causes of inflation, and contribute to policy discussions. Understand how monetary policy affects business decision-making and thus generates macroeconomic fluctuations
Lecture handout: Monetary policy*

This lecture covers a lot of ground but tries to give you a relatively simple, usable framework to relate monetary economics to monetary policy decisions. One problem when studying macroeconomics is the belief that it equips us with an ability to forecast. See my video on Economic Prediction for why I think we need to be careful.

The key finding of monetary economics is that the root cause of inflation is excessive money creation. We looked at some specific examples of hyperinflation, and to learn more you can watch “Zimbabwe and Hyperinflation: Who Wants to Be a Trillionaire?” (Marginal Revolution University). The BBC has an article to show how you can calculate your own personal inflation rate (provided it’s 2015 and you live in the UK!).

Conventional monetary policy is a simple link between a target (usually inflation) and a tool (interest rates). During the lecture I implied that central bankers change interest rates relative to the current rate. In some cases, however, they may be trying to move the policy rate closer to some sort of benchmark. A common benchmark can be calculate using a Taylor Rule. For examples, see Kaleidic Economics.

The key goal for monetary authorities is credibility: [Credibility flashcard]

To get a feel for how central bankers should respond to changing conditions, try these simulators:

A corridor system is when the central bank targets three policy rates. We looked at how those rates changed from 2003-2015 in the Eurozone. The ECB website has more recent data.

The Dynamic AD-AS model is a really good way to think through macro events. If it is unclear after the Monetary and Fiscal policy lectures, there are plenty more resources on this page of my website.

The lecture also introduces the concept of the signal extraction problem. This isn’t the most intuitive concept to grasp, but it explains how nominal shocks can have real effects. In other words how changes in the money supply can affect inflation and real growth. A good article on this is Steve Horwitz’s ‘The Parable of the Broken Traffic Lights“.

What constitutes an optimal currency areas? [Optimal Currency Areas flashcard]

I also like the “Econ Talk” podcast, and the episodes with Milton Friedman on Money (August 28th 2006), Allan Meltzer on Inflation (Feb 23rd 2009), and Charles Calomiris on the Financial Crisis (Oct 26, 2009), are particularly relevant.

What is a yield curve:


These resources form part of my Managerial Economics course map. You can watch the full YouTube playlist here. This page ties into Chapter 8 of ‘Markets for Managers’.

Fiscal Policy

Learning Objectives: Assess the efficacy of fiscal stimulus and aggregate demand management.
Lecture handout: Fiscal policy*

Keynesian approaches to aggregate demand management became popular because they were seen to have explained the problem of the Great Depression. My video on the Great Depression explores some of the history, and also have a video looking at The Financial Crisis of 2008-09. The big debate between Keynesian and Hayekian economics was popularised by Russ Roberts and John Papola in the rap battles Fear the Boom and Bust and Fight of the Century.

For some documentaries on the Obama stimulus, see:

Here’s the official website of the Williamson Tunnels and for more on Chinese “ghost towns” you can watch China’s Empty City or read this short World Bank blog post on the Rise of the Chinese Ghost Town. Despite what I say in the lecture,, not all dog rescues are disasters….

Here are some newspaper attempts to explain fiscal implications of tax policy:

Some podcast episodes that I particularly recommend:

Finally, my video on Macro Policy summarises policy makers options. [Macro Policy flashcard]


These resources form part of my Managerial Economics course map. You can watch the full YouTube playlist here. This page ties into Chapter 9 of ‘Markets for Managers’.

Public Finance

Case: “Rovna Dan: The Flat Tax in Slovakia”, Harvard Business School case no. 9-707-043, March 2010

When talking about macroeconomics I think it’s important to distinguish between the overall economy and the circumstances of an individual firm. We can’t always assume that macro conditions are felt the same by each company within it. I explain more in this video:

In terms of a flat tax, here is a short video asking  Would a Flat Tax Be More Fair?” There’s a good HBS article, from 2007, called “All Eyes on Slovakia’s Flat Tax”. Slovakia repealed the fat tax in 2013, which you can read about on this LSE Blog: Slovakia has abolished its flat tax rate, but other Eastern and Central European countries are likely to continue with the policy.

Regarding public finance more generally, in 2012 I participated in the 2020 Tax Commission. You can read our report here.

Regarding tax compliance, you may hear things like:

Apple can pretty much choose how much tax it wants to pay and to whom. One EU estimate was that it pad less than 0-01% tax on profits of over $100 billion (Frisby 2019, p.175)

This may be true, but it doesn’t mean that tax is voluntary. The choice that Apple have is over what activities they undertake, each of which have different tax implications. So they can affect their tax obligations, but only in as much as they alter their business decisions. They are still at the mercy of the state.

These resources form part of my Managerial Economics course map. You can watch the full YouTube playlist here. This page ties into Chapter 7 of ‘Markets for Managers’.